Fishing in New Zealand

A remarkable three-part programme in which we follow three renowned fishermen around New Zealand as they show off their various tricks in a discipline they master like few.

Fishing in New Zealand

Fishing in New Zealand

In the first programme, Chappie Chapman who has a lifetime of experience of trout fishing, takes us to the Mackenzie Country in the middle of New Zealand’s southern island, to the rivers at the foot of Mount Cook, the highest mountain in the country.

From there, we go to Lake Tekapo in the highland to do some still water fishing, a sport that is getting more and more popular. From Lake Tekapo, the trip continues to the crystal clear Grey River in the western part of the southern island – an area that is covered with rainforest – terminating end at the Waitahanui River.

Chappie Chapman gives advice on which fly to use, and he shows us what kinds of flies he always carries. We are told about the essence of trout fishing in New Zealand: the thrill when you see a big trout standing visible in the river and you steal upon it, and make it take a microscopic fly.

In the second programme, the very famous fly fisher Tony Entwistle, who has represented his country at several world championships, takes us fishing the rivers of the Nelson Lakes National Park in the upper part of New Zealand’s southern island.

First, we go to Travers River which is a difficult river to fish, because there are not many fish in it, and the ones that are, are difficult to spot, although the water is as clear as crystal. From there, we go to the Wairau River, which is a good fishing all along its 150 kms of length.

Tony Entwistle gives some good advice on how to net the fish, so that it won’t escape. Finally, we go to Caramia River, a river in the wilderness that suddenly became one of the world’s best Brown Trout fishing rivers, as an earthquake caused the surrounding rock walls to collapse, which created a lot of pools, one bigger and more beautiful than the other.

In the third programme, we go fishing the 600 m2 big Lake Taupo at the end of Waitahanui River with fly expert Dean Whyman who shows us his boxes of colourful flies, tells us about the different types, and gives us advice on combinations of nymphs and dry flies.

From Lake Taupo, we are taken to Lake Otawanakau, one of New Zealand’s many artificial lakes, created for the production of electricity. In these lakes the fish are growing very big. In Lake Otawanakau, fishing from a floating ring is demonstrated to us.

Finally, we go river rafting on the Tongariro River, the capital of trout fishing, in order to get to the right and hardly accessible part of the river. Because of the stream, the heavy tackle is necessary when fishing ‘the Mighty Tongariro’, known for its legendary rainbow trout. In this river we follow the drama of catching ‘the golden fish’, a rainbow trout of 15-20 pounds.

Director & Producer Lars Romby Nielsen
Produced by TV Belle
Duration 3 x 30 min.
Year of Production 1999
Original Title Fiskedagbog fra New Zealand
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